Episode 242 – New Markets for Artists / Commitment

Commitment

You should begin by making the decision to commit yourself to at least a year, but three years is better, because you can see how Abbey Ryan’s success grew very slowly. Next, you have to choose a platform for your daily postings in addition to eBay, like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or a blog. I would choose just one of these to start with, not all four. Twitter is one of the easiest, because you can write a small sentence and post a picture. If you want to write more, then you should choose Facebook or a blog. If you only want to post an image, Ins- tagram is wonderful. Ryan started with a blog because that way she could write more about her work. She told me that at first she thought she didn’t need to write about her art; she felt that the image said it all. But then she found that people wanted to know more and that it helped to sell the work. So if you are armed with dedication and knowledge of eBay and blogging, you may be ready to go. If you want to hear the entire interview with Abbey Ryan, you can listen to it on this website: yourartmentor.com.

To learn more about Brainard Carey and his services for artists, or to take a class from him, click here.  To join one of his free weekly webinars, click here. To download the workbook mentioned in this series, click here.

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Episode 241 – New Markets for Artists / Lessons from an Independent Artist

Lessons from an Independent Artist

It’s important to remember that this is not the only kind of art that Abbey Ryan produces, but it is how she earns a living. She works on other art projects in addition to her daily paintings, but her daily paintings remain consistent and familiar. In other words, she doesn’t experiment all the time with her daily paintings; she takes greater risks in her studio work that is not on eBay. The images she uploads every day are similar, and her audience knows what to expect.

There are many lessons to be learned from Abbey Ryan’s story, but more than anything it shows what can happen in today’s online markets, no matter where you live in the world. At the very least, it proves that eBay can be a legitimate resource for selling your work and earning a living. If you want to make a start in this kind of market, there are several things you take into consideration. Begin by thinking about what kind of work you could sell online, consistently, every day. Imagine yourself doing it. Does it feel exciting, or does it feel overwhelming? If it seems like a possibility for you, then the next step is to begin to formulate your strategy.

To learn more about Brainard Carey and his services for artists, or to take a class from him, click here.  To join one of his free weekly webinars, click here. To download the workbook mentioned in this series, click here.

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Episode 240 – New Markets for Artists / Success for Abbey Ryan

Why Success for Abbey Ryan?

There are many painters who follow this type of process, but Abbey Ryan has been particularly successful, so let’s examine why that is. To begin with, she was very consistent in her approach, especially during the first year. To put up a painting on eBay every day takes more than work; it takes dedication, especially when the prices are low and people aren’t bidding. In her first year, Ryan worked very hard and wasn’t making much money. Could you do that?

Ryan’s commitment was certainly one of the keys to her success. But let’s look at how she managed her online market. She was using three sources at first: eBay, a blog, and her website. That’s a total of three forums to update and manage every single day. It wasn’t very hard work, but she had to learn how to do it, and that takes time. That was some of what she learned and worked through in her first year. Also, she wasn’t shy about promoting her work and sending links to blogs and news outlets that might write about her. Now, if she gets press anywhere, she high- lights it right away on her website and blog and shares it with the world. She has added Facebook and Twitter to the mix now and also offers giclée prints of her work at $50. All of her knowledge on this type of selling was gained in less than three years, so no matter what age you are or where you live, in a few years you could potentially have a whole new education and career.

To learn more about Brainard Carey and his services for artists, or to take a class from him, click here.  To join one of his free weekly webinars, click here. To download the workbook mentioned in this series, click here.

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Episode 239 – New Markets for Artists / eBay and Selling Art Online: Two Cases

Chapter 6

eBay and Selling Art Online: Two Cases

Traditional methods still survive, but options are multiplying all the time for selling your work. Rags-to-riches stories are much more common today because the Internet has provided loop holes in the playing field so that emerging artists can suddenly gain fame through a blog or a viral video or other methods.

Abbey Ryan, the Painter Who Made a Living on eBay

The way art is marketed and sold keeps changing with the times. Now with eBay, Amazon, and other retailers, wholesalers, and trading services online, you have many, many options, and you can use one or several of these resources to sell your work.

To give an example of one approach to selling art online, I interviewed an artist named Abbey Ryan, who uses eBay to sell her work. Her process is fairly straightforward and very profitable. She began the practice of painting one canvas every day, a small, square canvas that was always the same size. The paintings were usually of a piece of fruit or a minimal still life. After she finished each painting, she would post it on eBay and also on her blog. She also sent out an email to friends telling them what she was doing.

For the first year she did this, the minimum bid on her paintings was around $50. At first, her paintings sold for well under $100 each on eBay. In fact, for a whole year, her paint- ings were selling for under $100 each, and some didn’t sell at all. But after a year, her prices began to increase because people were bidding higher on eBay. Now three years have gone by and each painting sells for $800 to $1,000. Since she makes over three hundred paintings a year, she is bringing in at least

$200,000 a year from this. For some artists, that might seem like a dream. Here she is in her studio—which is not in a major city—working away, shipping her art all over the world and making a living at it. There are other painters and writers who have used the Internet to create one work a day and get the word out to potential buyers. In 2011, there was a “draw every day” campaign running on Twitter, and many people simply took photographs of their daily drawings and uploaded the picture to their Twitter accounts. Commitment to this kind of a process can work well for writers and artists, because it helps them to put their work out there every day and feel supported by others doing the same. It’s also a great way to get constant feedback on your artistic output.

To learn more about Brainard Carey and his services for artists, or to take a class from him, click here.  To join one of his free weekly webinars, click here. To download the workbook mentioned in this series, click here.

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